Awards recognise innovation in agricultural machinery

Henty-directors 4479 web edited-1May 22, 2013

A lightweight tipping trailer designed for all terrain vehicles will be among the technological innovations in this year’s Henty Machinery Field Days Machine of the Year.

The prestigious award showcases machines at the cutting edge of spray, tillage, livestock handling and forage technology.

Announced on the opening day, this “farmers choice’’ award is presented to the most outstanding new piece of agricultural equipment exhibited at the Henty Machinery Field Days.

Machine of the Year chairman Matt Bergmeier said agricultural companies were encouraged to enter the awards.

Judged by an independent panel of regional primary producers, the awards cater for all machines on site released into the Australian market in the 12 months prior to the field days.

Judging criteria includes the machine’s purpose and suitability, scope of application, construction (durability and design), ease of maintenance and service, ease of operation and adjustment, availability of parts and overall value for money.

Graytill owner Dave Grayling, of Wellington, NSW, has entered his tipping ATV trailer in the awards – last year he competed with the GT 100 Series air seeder.

“We get a lot of people coming to our site as they have heard about our entry in the Machine of the Year, and have come to check it out,’’ Mr Gayling said.

He designed and manufactured the tipping trailer after family members expressed difficulty finding a lightweight tipping trailer the same width as a quad bike.

Last year, the award was won by Berrima Engineering’s Berrima BR1200 Rollerbar Hay Rake. Highly commended was the automatic sheep handler entered by Olsson Ag-Clipex.

 “Open to national and international entries, the award caters for any new or innovative machine launched on the Australian market,’’ Mr Bergmeier said.

Additional accolades presented over the field days are the Australian Tractor and Machinery Association Award for the best new Australian made machine.

It is judged and presented on the final day of the field days.

The Land-NSW Farmers Association Farm Inventor Award is free to any inventor to enter.

Entries must be innovative, easy to manufacture and provide a solution for Australian agriculture.

Awards recognise innovation in agricultural machinery

Henty-directors 4479 web edited-1May 22, 2013

A lightweight tipping trailer designed for all terrain vehicles will be among the technological innovations in this year’s Henty Machinery Field Days Machine of the Year.

The prestigious award showcases machines at the cutting edge of spray, tillage, livestock handling and forage technology.

Announced on the opening day, this “farmers choice’’ award is presented to the most outstanding new piece of agricultural equipment exhibited at the Henty Machinery Field Days.

Machine of the Year chairman Matt Bergmeier said agricultural companies were encouraged to enter the awards.

Judged by an independent panel of regional primary producers, the awards cater for all machines on site released into the Australian market in the 12 months prior to the field days.

Judging criteria includes the machine’s purpose and suitability, scope of application, construction (durability and design), ease of maintenance and service, ease of operation and adjustment, availability of parts and overall value for money.

Graytill owner Dave Grayling, of Wellington, NSW, has entered his tipping ATV trailer in the awards – last year he competed with the GT 100 Series air seeder.

“We get a lot of people coming to our site as they have heard about our entry in the Machine of the Year, and have come to check it out,’’ Mr Gayling said.

He designed and manufactured the tipping trailer after family members expressed difficulty finding a lightweight tipping trailer the same width as a quad bike.

Last year, the award was won by Berrima Engineering’s Berrima BR1200 Rollerbar Hay Rake. Highly commended was the automatic sheep handler entered by Olsson Ag-Clipex.

 “Open to national and international entries, the award caters for any new or innovative machine launched on the Australian market,’’ Mr Bergmeier said.

Additional accolades presented over the field days are the Australian Tractor and Machinery Association Award for the best new Australian made machine.

It is judged and presented on the final day of the field days.

The Land-NSW Farmers Association Farm Inventor Award is free to any inventor to enter.

Entries must be innovative, easy to manufacture and provide a solution for Australian agriculture.

From dairy calves to catwalk for designer Lindsay Whitehead

Lindsay-Whitehead 5275 web edited-1From dairy calves to catwalk for designer Lindsay Whitehead

Exotic costumes on a catwalk are a long way from feeding dairy calves but Upper Murray fashion designer Lindsay Whitehead takes it in his stride.

Lindsay, 29, uses breaks at the family’s Corryong farm to care for new born calves and irrigate pastures while perfecting his design skills and bespoke garments.

A career in musical theatre costume design has won him a place in the Melbourne School of Fashion, where he will fulfil an ambition to produce made-to-measure garments.

Also a trained milliner, Lindsay has entered the millinery section of the Henty Natural Fibre Awards in the past but last year’s event was his first with a complete outfit.

The entry was a full length, navy and white strapless evening gown with matching hat and made from pure cotton.

A love of singing and acting drew him to the theatre where he became involved backstage in musical productions held by Don Hillam Entertainment and Wagga Civic Theatre.

The creativity of the costume section drew him in.

As a young child, Lindsay had learnt basic sewing techniques from his mother Anne, a home economics teacher.

His interest was further developed during compulsory textile subjects in high school.

Lindsay’s skills were put to good use making theatre costumes and headwear for Wagga Wagga productions of Cabaret, Rent, Beauty and the Beast, Spelling Bee, The Boy from Oz, High School Musical and My Fair Lady.

“My Fair Lady was a challenge as it had a cast of 64 – I had up to seven women helping me sew the costumes,’’ he said.

He did everything from pattern making to sourcing costumes from other theatre companies for the sell-out show.

For his efforts, Lindsay was awarded the Canberra Area Theatre Award for best costumes in a musical in 2012.

He has studied under Wagga Wagga milliner Rose Organ, with his creations making the finals of the Wagga Gold Cup fashions on the field.

“My designs are rarely conservative – I like to make a statement with bespoke or one-off pieces,’’ Lindsay said.

His mentors include Japanese designer Shingo Sato, who produces stunning three-dimensional pieces, and former Christian Dior designer John Galliano.

Anne said her son had made her a few outfits, including a black coat.

“If someone is looking for something spectacular, he’s their man,’’ she said.

Lindsay has been accepted into the Melbourne School of Fashion, starting next month.

“I am not interested in working for retail clothing brands, producing a collection of ready to wear clothes but making custom made, one-off garments for individuals,’’ he said.

“I don’t enter the Henty awards to win but hope people watching the parade will appreciate the design work that has gone into the garment.

Lindsay conceded he enjoyed “putting my designs out there as you never know whose looking.’’

He is keen to use more wool, saying wool was usually promoted to young designers as suiting fabric.

“Wool is versatile and there is no reason why we can’t make exotic dresses out of it.’’

Lindsay will be among a host of amateur and professional designers to enter this year’s Henty Natural Fibre Awards.

Organiser Lyn Jacobsen said the awards recognised the innovative use of natural fibres in creative but wearable clothing.

Prize money of $2000 is offered for the best garment in natural fibre with $500 each for the best knitted or crocheted garment, accessory and millinery item.

For more details contact Lyn Jacobsen on 0428 690 222.

Anniversary sub-committee

Henty history to come alive in time for 50th anniversary

March 22, 2013

Four Riverina farmers boasting a long association with the Henty Machinery Field Days are gathering memorabilia for the 50th anniversary event.

Colin Wood, who served as co-operative chairman for 30 years, will be joined on a sub-committee by Culcairn farmers Andrew Thomson and Barry Scholz, and Bryson Terlich, of Yerong Creek.

The committee will spend the next few months tracking down headers similar to the original three models displayed at the Henty one-day header school in 1961. The models were a self-propelled CLAAS, and the power take-off models, International A8-4 and Massey Ferguson 585 (grey wheels).

Committee members hope to have the three headers on display at the field days on September 17-19. The celebration will also coincide with the centenary of German agricultural machinery manufacturer, CLAAS.

Mr Wood appealed to the public with any photographs or memorabilia from the field days during the 1960s to contact the HMFD office.

Meanwhile, recent rainfalls of 40-60mm in the Henty district have generated early sowing of winter cereals.

HMFD chief executive officer Belinda Anderson said the renewed grower confidence had come on the back of the Tractor and Machinery Association of Australia’s announcement of a boom year in tractor sales.

Last year 11,425 tractors were sold, putting 2012 among the top five years since 1987.

A bright spot was the activity in the tillage market, with strong sales in the large broadacre sector.

Mrs Anderson reminded last year’s Henty Machinery Field Days exhibitors to reapply by the end of May to guarantee a site. New site allocations will begin in July.

Mrs Anderson said Henty was gearing up for a record number of exhibitors this year with increased space available for additional sites.

She said preparations were well underway to make Henty’s 50th anniversary a spectacular event for the whole family.

Murray grey donation

March 22, 2013

Southern Australia’s biggest single agricultural event, the Henty Machinery Field Days, has given the Murray Grey Society a $1000 helping hand towards the breed’s 50-year celebrations.

Henty Machinery Field Days chairman Ross Edwards, who has bred Murray Grey cattle commercially, announced the donation towards the grand champion bull and female at this weekend’s Jingellic Show.

The field days will also celebrate its own 50 year anniversary on September 17-19, growing from a one-day header school at the Henty showground in the early 1960s.

The not-for-profit event now attracts more than 800 exhibitors across 1200 sites and a crowd of 60,000 people.

Mr Edwards said the Murray Grey Society had been an exhibitor at the field days across the decades.

“Each year, the field days receive strong support from Upper Murray exhibitors and visitors. We would like to show our appreciation by making this donation, and supporting our region’s very own beef breed,’’ Mr Edwards said.

“No doubt, there is huge interest in the 50 years of Murray Grey history and we are proud to support this special event for Murray Grey seedstock breeders, exhibitors, commercial producers and enthusiasts.’’

Mr Edwards said large amounts of hay and grain from the mixed farming areas surrounding Henty have gone into the Upper Murray.

In turn, Upper Murray producers have been solid purchasers of hay making equipment and machinery at Henty over the past 50 years, he said.

To help celebrate the field days 50th anniversary, a sub-committee of four Riverina farmers met this week to begin planning a display of memorabilia.

Colin Wood, Bryson Terlich, Barry Scholz and Andrew Thomson will spend the next few months tracking down headers similar to the original three models displayed at the Henty one-day header school in 1961.

The models were a self-propelled CLAAS, and the power take-off models, International A8-4 and Massey Ferguson 585 (grey wheels).

Committee members hope to have the three headers on display at the field days. They have also appealed for photographs taken at the field days during the 1960s to build the collection.

clearing sale 2

Plenty of bargains at first Henty field days clearing sale

March 22, 2013

One farmers’ trash turned into another’s treasure at the inaugural Henty Machinery Field Days clearing sale, with even phone boxes snapped up by eager buyers.

Farmers and second hand machinery dealers travelled from across the Riverina and northern Victoria to attend the multi-vendor clearing sale, a joint venture between Henty’s Ag n Vet and the field days co-operative.

The catalogue featured everything from kitchen sinks through to a Coles 16.5 tonne crane and two John Deere 9650 STS headers.

Buyers were reluctant to bid on the larger tractors, headers and boom sprayers but were happy to take home smaller items for the workshop.

Henty farmer Simon Male was both a vendor and buyer, outlaying $50 for a pair of phone boxes which once stood on the field days site.

Mr Male said the phone boxes would be a conversation starter at his annual stud sheep sale.

“I’m going to put them in my sheep yards so on a windy day all my paperwork won’t blow away,’’ he said. “I only had the idea upon seeing them – people will probably say ‘what the hell did you want with a telephone booth.’’ They’re all part of our nation’s history.’’

Mr Male was among almost 20 vendors taking the opportunity to clean out their machinery sheds and make some spare cash. Among the items he sold were a fire tanker, four wheel motorbike and silt scoop.

Berrigan second hand machinery dealer Ian Scott put the floor in the market, buying a trailing sprayer, off set discs and power tools.

 “There was some strong selling today and excellent sundry bargains,’’ Mr Scott said.

Auctioneer Mick Broughan said the plant and equipment was well presented and a credit to the vendors.

“After today we could look at least making it a biannual event,’’ he said.

Some of the prices included: Sheep crate – $95, buckrake – $375, sawbench – $300, post hole digger $250, tarpaulins $50-$150, drag chains $10-$50, pencil auger $250, hay rake $3200, off set disc plough $4400, ex-fire tanker $5100, covered feeders $1100, Yamaha four wheel motorbike $3200, heavy duty forks $50, Kawasaki mule with tipping trailer $4100, silt scoop $20, field bin $500, MIG welder $500, mixer wagon with electronic scales $5000, slasher $500, rubber tyred roller $2000.

An Acco-182 six cylinder petrol truck, made in 1966, and with an 18 foot checker plate tray, sold for $1400 while a 25 x 30 feet dismantled shed was bought for $2000.

Plenty of bargains at first Henty field days clearing sale

March 22, 2013

One farmers’ trash turned into another’s treasure at the inaugural Henty Machinery Field Days clearing sale, with even phone boxes snapped up by eager buyers.

Farmers and second hand machinery dealers travelled from across the Riverina and northern Victoria to attend the multi-vendor clearing sale, a joint venture between Henty’s Ag n Vet and the field days co-operative.

The catalogue featured everything from kitchen sinks through to a Coles 16.5 tonne crane and two John Deere 9650 STS headers.

Buyers were reluctant to bid on the larger tractors, headers and boom sprayers but were happy to take home smaller items for the workshop.

Henty farmer Simon Male was both a vendor and buyer, outlaying $50 for a pair of phone boxes which once stood on the field days site.

Mr Male said the phone boxes would be a conversation starter at his annual stud sheep sale.

“I’m going to put them in my sheep yards so on a windy day all my paperwork won’t blow away,’’ he said. “I only had the idea upon seeing them – people will probably say ‘what the hell did you want with a telephone booth.’’ They’re all part of our nation’s history.’’

Mr Male was among almost 20 vendors taking the opportunity to clean out their machinery sheds and make some spare cash. Among the items he sold were a fire tanker, four wheel motorbike and silt scoop.

Berrigan second hand machinery dealer Ian Scott put the floor in the market, buying a trailing sprayer, off set discs and power tools.

 “There was some strong selling today and excellent sundry bargains,’’ Mr Scott said.

Auctioneer Mick Broughan said the plant and equipment was well presented and a credit to the vendors.

“After today we could look at least making it a biannual event,’’ he said.

Some of the prices included: Sheep crate – $95, buckrake – $375, sawbench – $300, post hole digger $250, tarpaulins $50-$150, drag chains $10-$50, pencil auger $250, hay rake $3200, off set disc plough $4400, ex-fire tanker $5100, covered feeders $1100, Yamaha four wheel motorbike $3200, heavy duty forks $50, Kawasaki mule with tipping trailer $4100, silt scoop $20, field bin $500, MIG welder $500, mixer wagon with electronic scales $5000, slasher $500, rubber tyred roller $2000.

An Acco-182 six cylinder petrol truck, made in 1966, and with an 18 foot checker plate tray, sold for $1400 while a 25 x 30 feet dismantled shed was bought for $2000.

CEO Announcement

Henty---Belinda-Anderson 0345 edited-1Henty thanks five decades of field day volunteers

November 20, 2012

On the eve of Henty Machinery Field Days 50th anniversary, a public thank you has been extended by the co-operative’s board to the hundreds of volunteers involved in the event over five decades.

Now regarded as Australia’s biggest mixed farming field days, Henty is set to celebrate 50 years on September 17-19, 2013.

Co-operative chairman Ross Edwards paid tribute to the many volunteers who have kept the not-for-profit community event ticking since 1963.

“People come from a wide area to volunteer for traffic control and car parking, manning the entry booths, working in the catering sheds and cleaning the amenities,’’ Mr Edwards said.

“The services of the volunteer groups are valued.

“One of our key objectives is to maintain the broad community involvement that has contributed to Henty’s success over many years.’’

Mr Edwards, now entering his seventh year as chairman, also thanked exhibitors for their continued support, the general public for their attendance, and co-operative office staff and members.

In 2010, executive officer Doug Meyer retired after 38 years of service, with Albury sports and events administrator Graeme Hicks appointed to the role.

“Over the past two years, the site has been expanded and, in response, site holders have grown by 50 per cent to 1200 with more than 800 exhibitors,’’ Mr Edwards said.

“Henty continues to set new records with a crowd of 60,000 passing through the gates in 2011 and 2012,’’ he said.

“I’d like to applaud the people who put the field days together 50 years ago, the work and effort gone into by an enormous amount of people in that time to make the field days the success that they are.

“While there has been considerable changes over the past 18 months, more work still needs to occur to expand the offering at the site.’’

Mr Edwards said future options included making the field days site a year round destination point.

He said the location midway between Albury-Wodonga and Wagga Wagga lent itself to agricultural machinery displays and demonstration days, caravan, camping, lifestyle and truck expos.

A succession plan will also see company secretary Belinda Anderson take on the role of chief executive officer in 2013.

Graeme Hicks will work closely with Mrs Anderson to ensure the success of the 50th anniversary field days.

“Belinda comes to the field days with more than 20 years of experience in agriculture and administration, and is a local farmer,’’ Mr Hicks said.

“She gained a wealth of experience working with landowners and the Wagga Wagga Rural Lands Protection Board. That experience will be of considerable value to the Henty Machinery Field Days.’’

Mrs Anderson is a sheep and grain producer from Pulletop, farming 1100 hectares of the family property with husband Garry and their four children.

She described the new role as an “exciting challenge’’ and looked forward to working with a supportive team of directors, staff, members and the wider Henty community.

“The field days have grown extensively since I first attended in 1984 as a student from St Pauls College, Walla Walla, and to now have the opportunity to help members and volunteers organise such an integral community event is exciting,’’ Mrs Anderson said.

Chairman Ross Edwards said the co-operative now had a solid foundation to consolidate the gains made, and implement a strategic management plan for the next decade.

 

50 Year of Henty

Henty-documentary 4493 50 years of Henty field day memories captured on film

 Culcairn farmers Max and Ruth Scheetz recalled announcing their engagement during the Henty Machinery Field Days annual dinner.

The year was 1967 and the Scheetz family property was the host site for the field days that year.

Little did the family know how intertwined they and event would become – four generations across more than 50 years.

Mr Scheetz said the family’s passion for agriculture and farm technology drove their involvement.

“Our children all have the DNA of agriculture,’’ Mrs Scheetz said.

The couple were among many Henty Machinery Field Day pioneer exhibitors, committee members and volunteers to recall their memories to ABC Goulburn Murray announcer Gaye Pattison in a permanent historical record last weekend.

Captured on film, the personal accounts will form a social history of the first Henty header school in 1961 to what is now one of Australia’s largest single agricultural events. Last year, the field days drew more than 50,000 visitors to see 890 exhibitors on 1100 sites across the 89ha site.

The documentary will play on a large television screen in the centre of the site over the field days on September 18, 19 and 20 as a precursor to the 50th anniversary celebrations in 2013.

There were stories of snakes in the ladies lifestyle tent, testy exhibitors, a swampy site, flooding rains and long days clearing an old travelling stock reserve to create the present site. But, the highlight for most was the comradeship and community benefits generated by the field days.

Co-founder, past secretary and chairman Milton Taylor was among those to give a first-hand account.

Mr Taylor said the value of the field days to Henty was difficult to measure.

“The first time we hit a crowd of 3000 (and 60 exhibitors) we made headlines in all the local press and we thought we were Christmas,’’ Mr Taylor said. “Now it attracts 50,000 people a year and they’re talking 800 exhibitors.’’

Past chairman Colin Wood remembered working for Milton Taylor in 1961 when the first header school was organised at the Henty showground.

“To see (Milton) set (the header school plan) up every year on the lounge room floor of his house every year was unbelievable,’’ Mr Wood said.

“Today, you press a few buttons and everything comes up on screen.’’

Serving three decades as chairman, Mr Wood worked alongside local farmers clearing the old travelling stock reserve to create the new field day site east of Henty in 1977.

“Development in the first year was weekend after weekend – it was pretty solid but we could see the results happening,’’ he said. “There was a big number of exhibitors at the first field day and they just grew and grew after that.’’

Mr Wood said committee members endured many long meetings, with much work “quietly done at night time”. He said the ground work done by the volunteer members made the field days tick.

“As a town of 1000 people, we watched field day visitor numbers grow from 3000 to 5000, then 10,000 to 20,000 – we have been able to hold it between 50,000 and 60,000 in past years,’’ he said.

“It was set up as an educational field day as well – we endeavoured to keep in front of what was being produced or promoted. We have seen a lot of change in our 50 years but there’s going to be just as much change in the next 10.’’